A La Carte vs. All You Can Eat Sushi

Today we’d like to discuss a topic that is commonly asked in the sushi community here in Las Vegas–A la carte vs. All you can eat sushi. Which is better?

“Better” can be quite subjective, so we can break this down into several categories. Let’s discuss each topic one by one:

View of ample parking at Osaka Japanese Bistro Henderson location

Osaka Japanese Bistro has been an a la carte restaurant since its inception.

Before we begin this discussion, let’s be clear that Osaka Japanese Bistro is not all you can eat (ayce for short). Osaka Japanese Bistro only serves a la carte sushi in both its Sahara and Green Valley location. With that being said, it’s ultimately up to you to decide whether you want to eat a la carte or all-you-can-eat, as both will have pros and cons. With that being said, let’s discuss our first topic.

Kai's special sushi roll at Osaka Japanese sushi restaurant

AYCE options tend to be more budget-friendly!

Value.

It is a common belief that ayce will provide better value for your meal for it’s “unlimited” nature. If you’re looking for a filling meal and prioritizing quantity over quality, ayce may be the choice for you. However, most restaurants enforce a time and order limit on certain dishes. The time limit usually ranges from 60 to 90 minutes. Certain dishes such as uni (sea urchin), amaebi (sweet shrimp), and more are limited to one order per person. It is important to understand that while a la carte can be more expensive than ayce, utilizing specials and happy hours is an excellent way to undercut the regular costs.

Osaka tokujyo nigiri

While a la carte selections are more expensive, they tend to be higher quality than those offered at ayce restaurants.

Quality.

If you are prioritizing quality over quantity, usually the a la carte restaurants will provide a better experience. The reason for this is the fish is sourced from different vendors that can be more fresh and catered. At Osaka Japanese Bistro, we ensure that all our sources are fresh and routinely inspected for quality. Because ayce restaurants tend to focus on quantity than quality, they may not have the same flexibility when ordering fish from vendors. However, some ayce restaurants offer excellent value and quality for their menu items. It is best to do your research when selecting a restaurant to dine at.

Japanese food okonomiyaki

Okinomiyaki and other popular dishes are served at Osaka Japanese Bistro.

Diversity of Menu.

Because of the nature and popularity of ayce restaurants, the kitchen staff is primarily focused on serving ayce orders, even though it is very common to find that ayce restaurants offer an a la carte menu as well. The majority of customers that dine at ayce restaurants go for the ayce experience and not the a la carte. This, in turn, causes the kitchen staff to prioritize ayce dishes over its a la carte selections.

In comparison, a la carte restaurants are usually more diversified. A la carte restaurants such as Osaka Japanese Bistro only has one main menu. This not only simplifies the experience, but it allows the chef and kitchen staff to specialize the entire menu. For example, Osaka Japanese Bistro serves authentic cuisine such as noodles from soba to udon, donburi mono, sukiyaki, shabu-shabu, and even teppanyaki. If you want a range of selections, a la carte is usually the better choice.

In conclusion, there are pros and cons when you are considering dining sushi. Ask yourself these questions before making a decision. Do I want quality over quantity? Do I want more than just sushi? What is my budget?

Conclusion

At Osaka Japanese Bistro, we want to offer you the highest quality of sushi. Osaka always offer special promotions and discounts, so please check our social media channels and website periodically. You are always welcomed to call us for any daily specials as well. Happy dining!

Favorite Nigiri in Las Vegas

A simple question with multiple different answers–What’s your favorite nigiri in Las Vegas? Do you favor a popular choice such as salmon, or something more adventurous like scallop or sea urchin? Despite your answer, you can be rest assured that you are receiving the highest quality nigiri when you dine at Osaka Japanese Bistro.

Yellow Tail (Hamachi)

Yellowtail - Osaka Japanese Bistro

Yellowtail is a common favorite in most sushi restaurants.

I know many people that claim yellowtail (hamachi) is the best nigiri, and rightfully so. The yellowtail does so many things correctly. First, it is a generally neutral flavor with a subtle sweet after taste as you chew and swallow the fish. This cannot be said with some of the more dominant choices such as red caviar or more widely known as ikura (Also brilliant but in a different manner). Because of its rather neutral base, the yellowtail is one that is enjoyed at the beginning or the end of the course of the meal.

Sea Urchin (Uni)

Sea Urchin - Osaka Japanese Bistro

Sea Urchin (Orange colored fish at center). Not a common favorite, but a must for a sushi connoisseur.

Personally, my vote is the sea urchin (uni). Not only do I enjoy the rather fishy taste of the sea urchin, it’s also my “screening” nigiri of choice. When fresh, sea urchin is one of the most enjoyable nigiri you can select. However, it is quite expensive and succumbs to a rather short shelf-life. Thus, if you want to gauge how fresh (or not fresh) a restaurant really is, your best bet is to try the sea urchin and taste the quality. If the color is rather dull and its flavor overly fishy, chances are the restaurant is not very good at ordering fresh ingredients or keeping up its stock.

Conclusion

How about Osaka Japanese Bistro’s yellowtail and sea urchin? It’s been in business for decades and you’ll find many food critics claiming it as Vegas’ best when it comes to taste, quality, and service. Can you count on Osaka to serve exceptional yellowtail and sea urchin? You betcha! Come down and see for yourself.

Pairing Sake and Sushi in Las Vegas

Sake and Sushi in Las Vegas

Sake and Sushi in Las Vegas

It seems like sake and sushi has gone hand in hand for centuries. Traditionally speaking, the two hasn’t been enjoyed together routinely until the turn of the century. The reason? Eating rice and drinking distilled rice liquor was believed to be a huge no-no. It wasn’t until sushi was introduced to the West when it became common for individuals to enjoy sushi with a serving of sake. Naturally, it became integral within western civilization and Las Vegas to enjoy these two together.

What is the best combination for sake and sushi?

Choosing the right combination of sushi and sake can truly make the difference from a mediocre dinner to an exceptional meal. Here is a general rule of thumb when eating sushi and drinking sake:

  1. Sashimi goes best with a clean and crisp sake, such as Junmai Ginjo. Sashimi is not commonly eaten in the United States compared to Japan. However, most seasoned sushi connoisseur will agree that sashimi is sushi in its “purest form”. To complement this, critics will often recommend a smooth, clean sake such as Junmai Ginjo. Osaka Japanese Bistro serves a variety of Ginjo-style sake. Never had sashimi before? Read about it more here.
  2. Nigiri is enjoyed with a dry sake such as Junmai. Nigiri is my personal favorite amongst the three sushi categories. Sashimi is wonderful, but the composition of rice and a touch of wasabi with the fish is how I enjoy my sushi. For frequent nigiri diners, Junmai sake is the way to go for its dry, rich finish.
  3. Rolls should go together with Honjozo sake. Who doesn’t like a saucey, sweet roll? Because rolls tend to have many layers of flavor, it is commonly recommended to enjoy rolls with a richer sake like Honjozo.
Fresh Sake at Osaka Japanese Bistro

There are multiple options for sake. Make sure to choose the right one to drink with your sushi.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is effective to pair the type of sake with the style of sushi you are eating. Remember that not all sake is created equal, exactly like sushi. Take a look at our sushi menu and see what sake combination may work best for you. You can be rest assured that when you dine at Osaka Japanese Bistro, you are receiving the best quality in terms of sushi, sake, service, and more. Osaka Japanese Bistro is one of the longest standing Japanese restaurants in Las Vegas, thanks to our commitment to excellent service and culinary offerings.

You can read more regarding sake on our extensive post here.

Citations/Sources:

https://www.truesake.com/blogs/true-sake/14104133-ask-beau-what-s-the-rule-for-pairing-sake-with-sushi

Teppanyaki: Half Dinner, Half Entertainment in Las Vegas

Teppanyaki at Osaka is the best!

Hope everyone had a jolly good New Years! Today we want to discuss about Teppanyaki and why you should try it here in Las Vegas, the entertainment capital of the world.

Dinner, Entertainment. Why settle with just one when you can have both? Teppanyaki is gaining in popularity like never before! For those of you that are searching for a solid Teppanyaki choice in Las Vegas, you should be thrilled to know that both Osaka Japanese Bistro locations in the valley offer Teppanyaki. Here is why you should consider Teppanyaki for your next dinner or event:

Entertainment!

Teppanyaki is a combination of entertainment and dinner. We can guarantee that your dinner will be filled with juggling, fire from the grill, funny jokes, and that’s just the beginning. It all begins with our talented Teppanyaki chefs. They are highly experienced entertainers/chefs and they are trained to have you leaving with a smile.

Dinner is delicious.

Don’t forget that these entertainers are also certified chefs, and there is no doubt that the food you will eat will be very enjoyable. There are a variety of different meat and veggie choices offered during the meal, such as beef, shrimp, fried rice, eggs, and more. A single-person dinner is usually complete with fried rice or noodles and a main entree.

Family-Friendly Fun.

We highly encourage family outings! Teppanyaki dinners are open to people of all ages, so make sure to bring the whole family. Our Teppanyaki show will include juggling sticks on fire, egg spinning and tossing, and of course the iconic smoking onion tower. Feel free to take photos for social media and repost them for all your friends and family to see.

In conclusion, you can be sure to receive a filling dinner and tons of fun when you dine at Osaka. Please come and join us for our teppanyaki dinner tonight!

Top 3 Sushi Rolls You Need to Try in Las Vegas

Las Vegas is home to many unique attractions such as the iconic Las Vegas Strip, acrobatic Cirque De Soleil shows, exciting nightclubs, and more. Because Las Vegas is such a hot spot, you’re bound to find plenty of unique restaurants and eateries on and off the Strip. Naturally, restaurants strive to find new and creative ways to meet the expectations of the tourists and locals in the valley. Osaka Japanese Bistro is no exception. With the recent explosion of popularity in Japanese cuisine and primarily sushi, Osaka Japanese Bistro is always looking to improve its menu. Operational for over 50 years, Osaka Japanese Bistro has created award-winning sushi rolls over the years. Today, we want to share 3 sushi rolls that you need to try in Las Vegas.

3. Cajun Crunch Sushi Roll

A personal favorite of mine, the Cajun Crunch Sushi Roll is an explosion of irresistible flavor. The roll contains crispy shrimp tempura, cream cheese, and spicy crab topped with fresh albacore and Tataki & Banzai sauce. My first bite into the Cajun Crunch roll, I was met with the crunchy texture of the shrimp tempura. The oozy consistency of the cream cheese, however, was a nice contrast in comparison. The crab delivers just the right amount of spiciness to balance out the sweet and salty taste of the Tataki & Banzai sauce. The Cajun Crunch beautifully executes albacore, shrimp, and crab in one delicious roll.

2. Asakusa Sushi Roll

I had the pleasure of visiting Asakusa earlier this year during the Spring. While many temples are scattered throughout Japan, Asakusa is home to some of the most iconic temples in the bustling part of Tokyo. Though integrating modern buildings and roads without damaging the hundred-year-old temples were certainly a challenge, Asakusa is a clear example that old and new can seamlessly blend in today’s age. The Asakusa Sushi Roll does not exist in Asakusa, and sushi rolls, in general, are not nearly as popular in Japan compared to the United States. However, the Asakusa Sushi Roll served in Osaka Japanese Bistro is a perfect blend of Japanese-American sushi while containing the elegance and simplicity of Japanese sushi. It is served with spicy tuna, fresh albacore, and scallions topped with Tataki sauce. This fairly subtle but delicious roll is bound to impress you!

1. Roppongi Roll

This shouldn’t come as a surprise, as numerous celebrities, media, and Guy Fieri has raved about the Roppongi Roll. The Roppongi Hills in Japan is equivalent to that of Beverly Hills in the United States. If the prestigious class of these two neighborhoods is directly representative to the taste of this roll, then I cannot find a better name! The Roppongi Roll contains spicy tuna, shrimp topped with another serving of tuna, masago, scallions, and drizzled with Tataki and Yum Yum sauce. This beautiful combination of sauce and fish with a sprinkle of masago on the top of each roll is simply a masterpiece. If you haven’t tried the Roppongi Roll at Osaka Japanese Bistro yet, you should, especially if you are a constant sushi connoisseur.

In conclusion, these are the 3 sushi rolls I recommend trying in Las Vegas. You can find all three of rolls only at Osaka Japanese Bistro.

Osaka: The Ultimate Street Food Scene

Japan is known for many things–Eye-popping scenery, cutting-edge technology, unique culture, and more. But many can argue that Japanese cuisine stands above all else. Any fan of Japanese sushi and ramen should pay a visit to Japan to experience the food for themselves. More importantly, if you are a self-acclaimed foodie, you need to visit the eating capital of Japan, which is Osaka.

image of Tokyo skyline during twilight in Japan.

Tokyo is impressive, but what about Osaka?

I’ve had the pleasure of visiting Japan earlier this year in the Spring. It was my second time visiting Japan in a span of six months. Prior to visiting Osaka, I had stayed in Tokyo. Near my hotel, I had probably the best beef tonkatsu I’ve ever had in my life. The tendons are so soft your brain may think you’re eating sashimi rather than beef, even for just a few seconds. Of course, no visit to Tokyo is complete until you visit the famed Tsukiji fish market, where you can find some of the best fish in the world. If you’re unfamiliar with the type of fish in sushi, you might want to check out our article about it here. Then I visited Kyoto and had Kyoto-style ramen. I’ve had many bowls of ramen in the United States and in Tokyo, specifically around Shinjuku where its ramen are popular. However, nothing compared to the ramen I had in Kyoto.

Dontonbori during the Spring, 2018.

I thought I had a pretty good idea of Japanese cuisine…until I visited Osaka. There was nothing that could’ve prepared me for what I experienced at Osaka. As soon as you get off the bullet train and enter Osaka, it’s almost like you’re visiting another country. There are ancient castles that pierce through the skies along with modern skyscrapers and the dazzling lights of Dotonbori will impress even those accustomed to the Las Vegas Strip. As you step inside the streets of Dotonbori, the allure of the city will absorb you.

There is no doubt that Osaka is known for its marvelous street food. Whether you are a fan of okonomiyaki, takoyaki, or yakitori, you will be in street food heaven. Everywhere you turn is a tent smoking with a scent you simply can’t resist.

japanese chicken grill Yakitori set with leeks

Japanese Chicken Grill Yakitori set with Leeks

While Osaka Japanese Bistro here in Las Vegas is well known for its excellence in sushi, they boast a diverse menu that brings the elements of Osaka itself. If you can’t make a trip to Osaka in Japan anytime soon, that’s OK. You’ll find many common favorites such as takoyaki, kaarage (fried chicken), and gyoza from our late night menu. Are you a yakitori fan? Come and try our one of the dozen selections we offer at Osaka Japanese Bistro. Nothing will close to the food from Dotonbori for me, but Osaka Japanese Bistro is real close. But don’t just take my word for it, I urge you to come and try for yourself.

A Big Bowl of Udon Noodles

Enjoy Japanese Noodles in Las Vegas

What’s on the menu at Osaka Japanese Bistro in Las Vegas? A big bowl of Udon!

Udon Japanese noodles in a bowl on black slate table. Traditional Japanese dish.

What is Udon?

Udon is a thick, elongated Japanese noodle made with wheat flour. Its neutral flavor lends itself well to flavorful additions, such as soy sauce, chili pepper, sesame, ginger and scallions. Sounds simple, but udon noodles are one of the most popular noodles in Japan for very good reason! When properly seasoned, udon noodles are deliciously satisfying!

Why Choose Udon?

There are so many delectable Japanese noodles, so why choose a big bowl of udon when you visit Osaka Japanese Bistro in Las Vegas? Like much Japanese cuisine, udon noodles provide an abundance of health benefits that make them a wonderful source of nutrients. For starters, udon noodles provide complex carbohydrates. These are the “good” kind, which are processed slowly by your metabolism. This means that you will feel satisfied longer, which helps prevent overeating. Complex carbohydrates like udon noodles also aid in digestion of other foods, which is good for your digestive health. Udon noodles are rich in Vitamin B, including thiamine, riboflavin, niacin and folate. These vitamins help reduce stress and promote overall better health.

How Did Udon Noodles Originate?

Well, that depends upon whom you ask. One thing we know for sure is that the Japanese have been eating udon noodles for centuries, as part of their daily diet. Flour noodles probably originated in China and were introduced to Japan and were known as muginawa. One story claims that a Buddhist priest name Kukai introduced udon noodles in the Heian period. Another story claims that they were discovered by a Japanese envoy during the Nara era. Wherever they came from, we are proud and happy to serve them at Osaka Japanese Bistro in Las Vegas!

How are Udon Noodles Served?

Udon Noodles in a soup base with scallions known as Kake udon or Su udon in Japanese cuisine

Traditionally, udon noodles are served chilled in summer and warmed in winter. Either way, they are equally delicious! Because udon noodles absorb the flavors that surround them, they are commonly served with a warm seasoned broth mixture. First, the udon noodles are placed in the warmed bowl. Then a specially flavored broth is poured over them. To enjoy, you may use chopsticks or a fork to “capture” the noodles. Then tip the bowl to enjoy the flavored broth like a soup.

Japanese Noodles Served Hot or Cold at Osaka Japanese Bistro in Las Vegas

Udon noodles are perfect as a light lunch, or when you wish to have a healthy meal on the go. Udon noodles are not fast food in any sense, but at Osaka Japanese Bistro in Las Vegas we always have prepared udon noodles on hand for busy customers.

Are you ready to try udon noodles? We can’t wait to see you at Osaka Japanese Bistro in Las Vegas!

You will also find a huge selection of Japanese dishes that includes sushi, sashimi and teppanyaki specialties. Contact us today for a reservation or to order online!

What’s for Dessert at Osaka Japanese Bistro?

Osaka japanese bistro tempura ice cream dessert dish

At Osaka Japanese Bistro, diners will not only enjoy our fresh and authentic lunch and dinner menu selections at each of our two Las Vegas locations, you will also discover many instant favorites from our hand-picked selection of traditional and Japanese -inspired desserts.

Top Off Great Japanese Cuisine With a Great Dessert

You’ve just enjoyed a great meal, selected from Osaka’s wide menu of mouth-watering authentic Japanese dishes, prepared fresh from the best ingredients by our award-winning chefs. But you’re not done yet!

From melt-in-your-mouth Banana Cheesecake to our signature Tempura Ice Cream, you will discover our dessert selections are rich in flavor and offer just the right amount of sweet reward to top off your lunch or dinner with us.

Among our carefully selected and prepared desserts, we invite you to try the following:

Signature Tempura Ice Cream

Imagine vanilla ice cream wrapped in pound cake, then lightly batter-fried tempura style, and topped with our delectable blueberry sauce. This specialty dessert is uniquely prepared and served – and has become an Osaka signature recipe you simply must experience.

Tempura Banana

Osaka Japanese Bistro's tempura banana dessert dish

Enjoy our palate-pleasing take on the traditional banana split, featuring lightly battered and fried slices of banana, served with caramel and chocolate sauces. The light and crispy tempura crust marries extremely well with the sweet and creamy banana and has become a popular dessert selection at Osaka’s.

Banana Cheesecake

Delight in our Osaka house recipe, a rich banana cheesecake drizzled with warm caramel sauce. Our Banana Cheesecake is an absolute customer favorite all year round because of the sensational balance of flavor and texture. If you have discerning taste buds when it comes to cheesecake, then you will absolutely fall in love with this house favorite.

Warm Chocolate Cake

When you want more than a humdrum chocolate cake, this warm and rich spin on an American favorite will satisfy any chocolate craving. We serve this delightful dessert freshly baked with a creamy chocolate center, and of course, a la mode.  Make your request when you place your dinner order to allow for the 10-15 minute bake time.

Flavors of Japan Ice Cream Selections

homemade matcha green tea ice cream, japanese dessert

For a cool and refreshing end to your authentic Japanese meal, choose from our various Japanese flavor-infused ice cream selections including Vanilla Bean, Green Tea, Red Bean, Ginger or Plum Wine. Or for a truly authentic experience, our Mochi Ice Cream has the subtle flavor and smooth texture of sweet, melt-in-your-mouth mochi dough filled with a premium ice cream center. For the perfect after-dinner chaser, our Mango Green Tea Ice Cream is not only palate-cleansing, but is also very refreshing.

Enjoy fine dining and explore our delicious dessert menu at Osaka Japanese Bistro. We offer fresh and authentic sushi, teppanyaki grill and an extensive selection of authentic Japanese dishes at our two locations in Henderson and Las Vegas – just off the Strip. Experience uniquely Japanese culinary fare from the restaurant voted ‘Best of Las Vegas’ twenty times by our customers.

Cinco de Mayo Celebration in Japan?

cinco de mayo banner with Mexican dancer illustration

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Cinco de Mayo Celebrated in Tokyo, Japan

Cinco de Mayo is one of a handful of Western festivals that are celebrated in Japan. It seems an odd choice for Japanese to recognize, but that’s mostly due to local promotion as a fun, multicultural appreciation of Mexican and other Western cuisine and a chance for music and fun. Of course, although it’s not widely celebrated in Mexico, the May 5 festival is based on a Mexican story. On this day in 1862 at the Battle of the Puebla, a small ragtag Mexican fighting force defeated the massive French army during the Franco-Mexican war. It was popularized in America and exported to other countries, including Japan.

image of Tokyo skyline during twilight in Japan.

The holiday was first celebrated in Japan only in 2013 and consists mostly of a large festival in Tokyo. Attendees enthusiastically celebrate the cultures and cuisines of Central and South America with food, drink and song. They enjoy a huge selection of dishes from places like Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Chile and even Jamaica. Of course, party goers also enjoy exotic cocktails like margaritas, pina coladas and mojitos. Music offerings reflect North and South American genres like salsa, samba, jazz and rock. The celebration goes on all weekend.

While Cinco de Mayo is mostly a day celebrated in Tokyo and hasn’t quite made it to every town and village in Japan, the enthusiasm for a spring weekend celebration listening to great foreign music and munching on delicious exotic dishes is spreading in popularity in Japan.

Celebrating Cinco de Mayo in Vegas

outdoor partiers in Las Vegas celebrating Cinco de Mayo holiday

Lovers of the Japanese culture and those who wish to check out Cinco de Mayo do not have to travel to Tokyo. Holiday celebrations are also held in Las Vegas which, of course, delivers entertainment as only Vegas can. The Fremont Street Experience features music and entertainers, and most bars and casinos  have Cinco de Mayo specials. Of course, once you’ve celebrated, you’ll be hungry enough for Japanese food at Osaka Japanese Bistro, the original Japanese Restaurant in Las Vegas. We welcome all the partygoers, whether for a sumptuous dinner or for late-night snack.

Osaka Japanese Bistro teppanyaki chefs at their grill portrait of three teppan expert chefs

Osaka provides three distinct experiences for its patrons. We feature a top-quality fresh sushi bar with the town’s best and freshest selection of award-winning sushi. And, we are a steakhouse where our expert chef will prepare your meal before your eyes at the teppanyaki grill experience. We also offer a huge menu of authentic Japanese dishes, something for every taste and appetite. Check out our extensive menu.

Teppanyaki, Sushi and More at Osaka Japanese Bistro

Osaka Las Vegas el pollo loco sushi roll on a plate

El Pollo Loco Roll

Osaka serves fabulous sushi like the el pollo loco roll at our busy sushi bar.  Or enjoy your own private party with tatami-style dining for an authentic Japanese dining experience. Stop in or book your space ahead of time for Cinco de Mayo or any night at Osaka Japanese Bistro on Sahara just off the Las Vegas Strip and on Eastern Ave in Green Valley.

What is Yakitori?

Yakitori: Japan’s Favorite “Fast Food”?

young girl traveler enjoying delicious grilled yakitori chicken skewers on street market in Japan

Think: grilled chicken on a skewer. Whether it’s early morning or late evening or some time in between, it’s the craving you did not know you had. Until now. Yakitori, which basically is the Japanese term for “grilled chicken,” is Japan’s version of mouth-watering barbecued chicken. Secured on a wooden skewer prior to cooking, the chicken is grilled to perfection a variety of forms.

yakitori skewered grilled chicken dish displayed on plate

But this gastronomic delight is not just about taste, but  also culture.

Yakitori and Japanese Culture

Chicken was once a luxury in Japan, going back to the Meiji Restoration period, starting around 1868. The Meiji era brought huge change, including change to the Japanese diet – the addition of meat. Chicken meat was regarded as a luxury, and greatly prized.

At the same time, small stalls selling skewered fish and vegetables outside temples were already popular. Capitalizing on the demand for chicken, the first chicken kebab shop was installed outside temples. But chicken was still expensive, and the owners of these small stalls could not afford chicken meat, so they used chicken carcass or gristle they found dumped outside higher-end restaurants. This cheap but tasty version of chicken made via the popular skewering methods became a favorite. The rest is history as they say, and yakitori was cultivated to become a diverse variety of tastes and textures, becoming one of Japan’s favorite snacks.

Yakitori in Japan

japanese chicken grill Yakitori set with leeks

Yakitori in Japan is prepared and enjoyed in various ways today. The kind of yakitori is generally named after the part of the chicken used, from thighs and breast meat to gristle and cartilage to hearts and liver. Some popular types include:

  • Negima. Pieces of chicken thigh meat skewered and adorned with pieces of leek in between each piece of chicken. Negima is one of the most popular types of yakitori in Japan today.
  • Momo. This is simply pieces of skewered chicken thigh meat.

japanese meatball grill or tsukune cooked with teriyaki sauce ready to eat

  • Tsukune. Tsukune is a type of yakitori least reminiscent of yakitori’s history, but is popular today in Japan. It is a mix of minced chicken, egg, vegetables and spices skewered on a stick as several small meatballs.

Chicken skin grilled with charcoal fire in Japanese style call torikawa or yakitori serve in izakaya food restaurant.

 

  • Torikawa. Maybe the most reminiscent of the first grilled chicken in the small stalls outside temples, torikawa are strips of fatty chicken skin grilled until crispy.
  • Nankotsu. Also reminiscent of the first chicken kebab stalls, nankotsu is skewered, crunchy cartilage with minimal chicken.

Japanese restaurants and their chefs enjoy experimenting with this traditional food with different spices and sauces. But different meats can also be used, like seafood, beef, and pork. In addition to some of these tasty yakitori snacks are other kebabs that complement these chicken kebabs, like asparagus bacon, green onion, shitake mushroom, green peppers, eggplant, and shrimp. Beer and sake are often enjoyed and paired with specific types of yakitori. Traditionally, these kebabs are gilled on a rectangular clay box, only two feet long and a few inches wide. As such, the kebabs are small and delightful, and thus: snack-ish foods. But they can also be grilled using a tabletop hibachi or a teppanyaki grill – those hot steel plates forming the center of a table at many Japanese restaurants.

Enjoy Yakitori at Osaka Japanese Bistro

chicken yakitori and other skewered grilled delicacies from Osaka teppan yaki grill displayed on plate ready to eat

At Osaka Japanese Bistro in Las Vegas we prepare authentic Japanese dishes, using recipes from Japan. Osaka Japanese Bistro provides a Teppan grill menu of all the famous Japanese dishes you could imagine, from sushi to tempura to soba to teriyaki to yakitori. Of course we have an extensive variety of yakitori dishes to tempt your palate. At our teppanyaki grill and on our kitchen menu, you will find a variety of yakitori flavors:

  • Mi, which is thigh meat… that juicy, meaty part of the chicken.
  • Shiro Me, which is white meat… that healthier, tastier part of the chicken.
  • Suna Gimo, which is gizzards… that twisted, chewy part of the chicken.
  • Reba or kimo, which is the liver… that deep, sumptuous part of the chicken.
  • Sinzo, which is the heart… that rich and hearty part of the chicken.
  • Torikawa, which is the skin… that crispy part of the chicken.
  • Tebasaki, which is the wing… a favorite part among chicken-lovers.

If you are in the mood for something tasty and fun, something that can be either a snack or turned into a meal, then try yakitori. There’s nothing quite like it, and it’s available close to you at Osaka Japanese Bistro, just off the Strip in Las Vegas and in nearby Henderson, NV. Come in and enjoy today.

Steak and Sushi: A Great Combination

Osaka Las Vegas teppan grill sizzling steak

When it comes to indulging in a great dinner, steak and seafood usually top the list. It’s important to keep in mind, however, that not all seafood is created equal. If you want a truly incredible experience, elevate your plate with an award-winning combination: steak and sushi.

Las Vegas just happens to have one of the country’s premier Japanese steak and sushi houses right here in town. Osaka Japanese Bistro features masterful sushi creations that could stand alone, but why should they have to?

Take a look at a few of our favorite reasons why steak and sushi offer the perfect food pairing.

Great Japanese Steakhouse and Award Winning Sushi

Fresh aji sashimi by Osaka Japanese Bistro

Osaka’s amazing sushi is an experience all by itself. Award-winning sushi rolls, and fresh perfect cuts of sashimi and nigiri provide an infusion of flavor sensations worthy of a night out on the town.

At Osaka in Las Vegas, we like to up the ante, so to speak, on the experience we offer our guests. We also offer a full menu from our Teppan grill, which features everything from outstanding appetizers to filet mignon that will make your heart melt. Best of all? We invite you to perch yourself alongside our Teppanyaki chefs so you can enjoy an interactive experience with your steak and sushi selections.

Pairing Steak and Sushi for a Mouthwatering Dining Experience

White Tiger sushi by Osaka Japanese Bistro

White Tiger

Steak and sushi certainly have very little in common. But, together they’re a great combination of flavors and, when done right, they’ll both make your mouth water. Why are they so great together? Great steak doesn’t require a ton of seasonings and spices, as the meat should speak for itself. On the other hand, creative sushi invites folds of flavor that play upon each other by way of sauces, toppings, and textures. After you enjoy a bite of succulent steak, your taste buds will be excited to receive the fish-inspired flavors coming their way next.

Naturally, you could go the simple route, opting for traditional rolls that have simpler ingredients and lighter flavors. Either way, if you enjoy food made fresh by craftsmen skilled in their culinary specialty, the flavors of steak sizzled to perfection by our teppanyaki chef and sushi crafted by our sushi master, you will be rewarded with an amazing dining experience.

Don’t Decide Between Steak and Sushi!

Osaka Menu Image 27

Nobody said you need to decide between a steakhouse and a sushi experience. These two elements are the perfect marriage for a great night out, and thanks to Osaka’s extensive menu, there are plenty of items for you and your dining partners to sample and share throughout the evening.

Osaka Japanese Bistro is Las Vegas’ premier steak and sushi establishment. From unbeatable date nights to family-friendly outings and group get-togethers with friends, we’ve happily been serving locals and visitors to Las Vegas since 1967. In fact, Osaka was the first Japanese restaurant in Las Vegas, and we’re proud to say we’ve accumulated quite a collection of awards since that time. If you’re craving incredible steak and unforgettable sushi, we invite you to stop by and see us! Feel free to ask our servers and chefs which combinations are their favorites!

 

Why We Don’t Serve “All You Can Eat” Sushi

Kai's special sushi plate at Osaka Japanese Bistro

Osaka Japanese Bistro has been part of the Las Vegas food scene for over 50 years. And, all that time, we haven’t offered an “all you can eat” sushi menu, even though we know that’s a popular choice among some diners. We brought the first Japanese food to Las Vegas back in 1967 and we still serve an extensive, authentic Japanese menu. We make more sushi in Vegas than just about anyone, catering sushi for many local events as well as providing quality sushi to casino-resort buffets and restaurants. And of course, we serve a wide selection of top quality fresh sushi in our own restaurants in Las Vegas and Henderson.  So what gives? Why don’t we also offer “all you can eat” sushi, too?

We Can Beat “All You Can Eat”

Here are 4 reasons why at Osaka we don’t offer “all you can eat” sushi on our menu:

1. Osaka Japanese Bistro Serves Only the Freshest Fish

Osaka is proud to serve the freshest fish in Las Vegas. We have cultivated and developed relationships that bring us the best selection of fish from Japan, including seasonal delicacies and hard-to-find varieties. We take pride in using only fresh caught fish in our sushi, delivering rich, fresh taste and quality that set Osaka apart from the rest.

On the other hand, an all-you-can-eat sushi restaurant requires purchasing fish in bulk and then freezing it to have large quantities available for producing less costly and faster sushi plates. Once frozen, fish loses its delicate, fresh texture and taste.  And, research shows that besides affecting the texture, freezing can also increase the bacterial content of the fish, which, if followed by improper handling, can lead to illness. When fish is frozen, it loses water and most of the soluble minerals and vitamins. Compromising quality for quantity is not in our DNA, so we stick with the best fish available and prepare it fresh at its peak. If that means serving less sushi, then we are ok with that. Our customers agree and return again and again, excited to see what fresh, new taste might be available each time they visit.

2. We Serve the Better Cuts of Fish

fresh cut sashimi swith lemon and cucumber at Osaka

All you can eat establishments use the whole fish to be able to produce large quantities of sushi at a minimal cost. It is no secret that customers tend to eat or order more of all-you-can-eat, yet the price is usually held to a reasonable level to attract new customers. Since the cost of doing business is important for any establishment, low price and high volume make it necessary for the restaurant to find ways to save money on the ingredients it uses.

At Osaka, our expert, our trained sushi staff carefully select the best cuts of fish in order to deliver the highest quality and consistently perfect sushi to the taste of our discriminating clientele. We have many regular customers who know sushi well and can attest to the quality of the sushi platters served to them. They have their favorite dishes and know they will get the same high quality dish every time they order it. Osaka prefers to stay one cut above and not have to compromise on the quality of the fish we use.

3. Seasonal Availability of Sushi Specialties

Osaka Japanese restaurant Tokujyo nigiri plate

Osaka’s sushi bar is the home of variety and rare dishes. Its menu reflects the restaurant’s focus on offering its clients not just the freshest, but also hard to get, fish species. Osaka’s ability to find and prepare the most interesting and new varieties of sushi has made it home to many local and visiting sushi connoisseurs. Specializing in seasonal varieties and testing new flavors and recipes doesn’t work well in an all you can eat situation, so you won’t find all you can eat specials at Osaka.

Instead, at Osaka, we pride ourselves on our wide and changing menu of sushi, as well as other traditional Japanese dishes. Most all-you-can-eat sushi restaurants settle for a fixed menu that is inexpensive, fast and easy to prepare. That is not our style at all. Some fish species are so rare and hard to find that their price will be higher, and we do pass that along to our customers. But these savvy customers know an extraordinary sushi-eating experience, and they are happy to pay a little more for excellence and the chance to taste a rarely available delicacy prepared by Japan-trained sushi masters.

Certain varieties of fish are only available on a short-term seasonal basis. Just look at a few of the daily specials we prepared one day last fall:

Osaka daily sushi menu board sushi specials

4. Expertise and Care in Sushi Preparation

Besides variety, Osaka prides itself on making authentic, high quality sushi, that we think is the tastiest, freshest and the best sushi in Las Vegas.  Our sushi chefs are trained in Japan, and have years of training and practice. Along with their knowledge of preparing fresh sushi to the highest standards, they have a flair for creativity, style and presentation. Osaka takes pride in its skill at the best sushi-making methods and recipes, and passes this along as a great sushi-eating experience for all its restaurant customers and in its sushi catering business as well. But this high quality and careful preparation means no corners can be cut, making ours an unsuitable place for all you can eat sushi.

Only the Best Quality Sushi is Available at Osaka Japanese Bistro

sushi spring roll fresh sushi from Osaka

A complete focus on quality is why Osaka does not serve all-you-can-eat sushi. Altering selection, ingredients or preparation to accommodate the needs of an all-you-can-eat menu in our opinion is a compromise of quality, taste, and presentation of the food. Our sushi chefs esteem their customers too highly to serve pre-made foods or ones that compromise quality over quantity. We serve only fresh sushi at our restaurants, made to order for each individual customer, just as our founders did years ago, and we take pride in doing so.

Forget “All You Can Eat” and Eat the Best Handmade Sushi at Osaka

Osaka Japanese Bistro is an award winning, family-owned Japanese restaurant in Las Vegas that is well loved among local Las Vegans and tourists alike. Not a few local dignitaries, celebrities and entertainers have made Osaka their night-time spot for a great meal and a good time over the years. Our tasty sushi menu features regular flavors and seasonal delicacies with a selection of sushi rolls, mouth-watering nigiri and fresh sashimi. You won’t find all you can eat, but you can eat all you want at our friendly sushi bar, or enjoy sushi as a complement to your meal at a table or in a traditional tatami room.  Stop by either of our two locations, the original Osaka Japanese Bistro on Sahara Avenue off the Las Vegas Strip or visit Osaka Henderson in Green Valley and taste the difference for yourself.

Celebrate the New Year with Osaka Japanese Bistro

Las Vegas’ Best Japanese Restaurant Off Strip Shares Japanese New Year Traditions

Teappan lobster on the grill with vegetables

No matter how you celebrate the New Year, some traditions are universal. Like the holidays in America, Japanese New Year is about spending time with loved ones to show them how much they’re cherished. It’s also a time to enjoy ancient ritual customs designed to start the New Year off in the best way. And, of course, it involves lots of food and fun.

At Osaka Japanese Bistro in Las Vegas, we combine traditional Japanese food and drink with fun and great service every day of the year. To celebrate the New Year, like our ancestors, we enjoy the Japanese philosophy of combining merriment with meaning. If you have not lived in or traveled to Japan, here are a few Japanese New Year traditions that natives enjoy:

Ring Out the Old, Ring in the New

Japanese temple bells on the wall ringing for new year celebration

Perhaps the most solemn of all the Japanese New Year’s traditions is the ringing of the bells on New Year’s Eve. These are typically done from within the Buddhist temples. The bells ring 108 times. That number represents the 108 common human sins, according to Buddhist tradition. Visitors may be invited to ring the bells after the original 108 tolls are finished. This privilege symbolically purifies visitors and listeners of those sins as they head into the new year.

Bonfires and Fireworks

Colorful firework over abstract beautiful temple in japanese style celebrate new year at night time

A festive bonfire is a gathering place for fellowship, as well as a gathering place to bring everyone together before heading out to other traditional New Year’s Day activities — going to temple or church just after midnight (hatsumode), and/or staying up to watch the sun rise. Modern Japanese enjoy fireworks much as people do around the world which may take the place of the traditional bonfire gathering.

Once you’ve finally gone to sleep, don’t forget to make note of your first dream of the New Year, known as hatsuyume. This dream is considered an omen of the things to come for the year. So if you’re the type who can “pre-program” your dreams, try to see a hawk, eggplant or Mt. Fuji in your night visions — all are auspicious!

Japanese New Year Delicacies

Osaka japanese restaurant sashimi plate

Of course, food plays a big role in the celebration of the New Year. Small delicacies collectively known as Osechi Ryori, are an important New Year’s tradition. These bite-sized treats can be sweet, sour or savory. Sushi and sashimi are often included, as are the sticky rice cakes known as mochi. In fact, a traditional New Year’s tabletop decoration, Kagami Mochi, involves balancing an orange over two mochi cakes.

kagami mochi cake is decorated in the New Year in Japan.

For those who don’t cook, osechi selections are often offered in Bento boxes, so that you can select items based on the needed variety (there are at least 50 traditional osechi dishes for the holiday!), as well as your number of guests.  

New Year Gift-Giving and Well-Wishing

Of course, children are often the focus of the winter holidays, and the Japanese are not immune to this indulgence. Adults traditionally give a specially-decorated envelope or card with money (otoshidama) containing up to 10,000 yen, or about $85. If there’s just one child in the family, the amount increases as the child gets older. If there are several children in the same family, the amount is the same. A Japanese child often receives otoshidama from parents, grandparents, family friends, and aunts and uncles.

Japanese children's New Year greeting card 2018 Year of the Dog

2018 is Year of the Dog

Another type of card is associated with New Year’s in Japan — nengajo. Billions  of these holiday postcards are sent in Japan alone,  with more being sent by Japanese expatriates around the world. These hand-addressed, traditional greetings, are all mailed in time to arrive on New Year’s Day.

Celebrate the New Year at Osaka Japanese Bistro

 

 

Osaka Japanese restaurant bento box lunch chicken beef sushi sashimi tempura rice and salad

Regular visitors and residents in Las Vegas know Osaka Japanese Bistro serves Vegas’ best sushi and largest authentic Japanese menu, from appetizers to fantastic desserts. Osaka is a hot spot for late night sushi fans or for a light and healhty meal after a show on the Strip or a night at the movies.

Spending Holidays in Vegas? Enjoy a Fabulous Meal on New Year’s or Any Day at Osaka Japanese Restaurant

You could say that Osaka Japanese Bistro has celebrated a few New Year’s Eves in Las Vegas. In 2017, we celebrated our 50 years in the Las Vegas area. Our two locations — just off the Strip on Sahara in Las Vegas, and in Green Valley, Henderson — are favorites of locals and visitors alike. In fact, this year, we were featured by Guy Fieri and the Food Network who enthusiastically recommended us to their viewers!

You’ll feel comfortable and at home at Osaka in our friendly, relaxed atmosphere, with different seating options to choose from, including private tatami rooms, regular Western seating and a fun teppanyaki grill experience. And of course, sushi connoisseurs and fans always enjoy the action at our lively sushi bar where our expert sushi chefs work with our huge selection of the best and freshest fish in town, to deliver delicate and delicious works of art.

Lift a glass of select Japanese beer and premium sake rice wine, or a choice of other beverages, when it’s time for those New Year’s toasts!

From sushi to nigiri and sashimi, Bento boxes to party boats, tempura to hot pot, there’s something for everyone on holidays or any day at Osaka. No matter what your holiday plans, keep in mind that we’re open 7 days a week with a special  late night menu most nights.

Favorite Japanese Holiday Foods

Anyone who has traveled to Japan, or eaten in an authentic Japanese restaurant knows that the Japanese enjoy a rich, diverse and carefully prepared cuisine. In a country with thousands of years of history and many different regions, each with their own style and specialty dishes, many dishes have long cultural significance. Like most people, the Japanese associate certain foods with family occasions, holidays or festivals. Here are a few special Japanese dishes that are associated with important days on the Japanese calendar.

Japanese New Year’s Favorite: Osechi Ryori

A traditional mix of Japanese New Year's foods called Osechi Ryori.

Oshogatsu (New Year) is the most significant day of the year in Japan. Celebrated on January 1 and usually extended a few days into the new year, Oshogatsu is a time to celebrate and contemplate the New Year. It’s a day when people usually return home to be with their families and gather at the shrines to greet the gods.

On New Year’s Eve, families prepare osechi ryori, a special meal that includes a variety of foods, including dishes like sweet rolled omelet, fish cake with salmon roe, candied sardines, daikon and carrot salad, smashed chestnut and sweet potato paste, and simmered chicken and vegetables. These are prepared in advance to avoid cooking during the first three days of the year according to custom, so they are often vinegared or sugared to keep during that period.

Springtime: Hinamatsuri and Chirashi Zushi

Chirashi sushi bowl

Chirashi

Hinamatsuri or Girl’s Day in Japan, is celebrated each year on March 3rd. It is one of several ancient annual celebrations that go back over a thousand years.  The day is dedicated to girl children and features the display of ornamental dolls representing the Emperor, Empress and their royal court. Hinamatsuri celebrations feature their own traditional dishes with some variety based on the region of Japan. Sushi is usually part of the meal, as well as hishi-mochi, or diamond-shaped rice cakes colored in spring colors representing fertility and good health. as well as hamaguri-zushi which is a small rice ball wrapped in a thin omelet shell, giving it a clam-like shape. Chirashi-sushi is a collection of colorful sushi usually in colors of yellow, green, white and pink.

A Spring Ritual: Cherry Blossoms, Sakura Mochi, Onigiri and Miso

Sakuramochi, japanese confectionery wrapped in a preserved cherry on white background.

Hanami or Cherry blossom festival is one of the most popular holidays celebrated in Japan. The whole country stops work to enjoy and celebrate the blossoming of the cherry trees, called sakura. Most of the parks open their gates for families who hold their parties below the trees. The Hanami celebration includes preparing homemade foods, including onigiri (rice balls wrapped in seaweed), miso (bean paste) and sakura mochi (preserved cherry sweets). Bento meals may also accompany the family  as they picnic among the blossoming cherry trees. The meal may also be supplemented with sake or even a tea ceremony with special teaware and a blend of organically grown sakura, green and black teas.

And, then, there’s KFC for Christmas

In a country whose 99% of the population is non-Christian, the secular side of Western Christmas has been widely adopted and is celebrated with decorations and gift giving. American fried chicken icon, KFC, played a part in the popularization of Christmas. And now, each year, it seems locals can’t get enough of KFC chicken. “Kentucky for Christmas”, a 1974 marketing campaign in Japan introduced KFC, and a holiday tradition took off from there. Today on Christmas, the locals make long queues at KFC or even order in advance to escape the waiting time.

End the Year with Toshikoshi Soba

Japanese toshikoshi Soba noodle ramen in ceramic bowl, Japanese food

At the end of each year, Japanese make sure to have a meal of soba noodles in a dish called toshikoshi soba. The custom can be traced to the Edo period when it is believed to have started at one Buddhist temple that fed soba to poor people to celebrate the coming of the New Year.  Because noodles are easy to cut when chewing, a dish of soba noodles symbolizes the end to the hardships the Japanese people had to undergo as they labored all year round, and it let’s them start the New Year fresh.

To make toshikoshi soba, the soba noodles, which are made from buckwheat flour, are cooked with a blend of soy sauce, mirin and sugar, and then garnishing using onion. The mixture is then heated over a flame until the broth simmers. Once ready, it gets apportioned and served in bowls.

Japanese Pancakes: Enjoy Okonomiyaki Year Round

Japanese food okonomiyaki

Okonomiyaki is a savory version of the Japanese pancake prepared using a variety of ingredients. The dish originated in Osaka but is now popular everywhere and enjoyed year round The term okonomiyaki in Japan means ‘grilled how you like it.’  While Okonomiyaki are enjoyed during matsuri, or festivals, they are popular year round. There are even restaurants that specialize in okonomiyaki where patrons can select and mix their own ingredients. Normally, okonomiyaki is prepared by blending flour, eggs, cabbage, pork belly slices or meat, and then decorated with a variety of toppings for an excellent flavor. Great chefs and homemakers all love to come up with new combinations and topping ideas for this versatile pancake which is also a great way to use up leftovers.

For Your Holiday Celebrations Enjoy Authentic Japanese Food with Osaka

WIth one of the biggest and most authentic Japanese food menus in Las Vegas, Osaka Japanese Bistro offers an extensive selection of Japanese dining for every taste and event. Whether you want to celebrate New Year’s with a late night sushi party or a birthday with a Teppanyaki feast, springtime with a fresh chirashi sushi bowl, or just enjoy the taste of homemade Japanese food like okonomiyaki or a steaming bowl of tasty chicken udon, stop by either of our locations open late in Las Vegas and Henderson and step into a festival of delicious food.

What to Look for in the Best Japanese Restaurants

Osaka meal including sushi pot stickers

A great Japanese restaurant invites its patrons to share in the full sensory experience that is Japan. From the purposeful presentation of each dish to the soft lighting and tranquil environment, each element of service is meant to heighten the culinary and cultural experience. An authentic Japanese restaurant will hold true to featuring menu selections that use seasonal market ingredients and ocean-fresh fish. Even the basics of rice and noodles are cooked and served with a masterful touch of perfection and taste.

Osaka Japanese Bistro Award-winning Local Las Vegas Icon

For over 50 years, Osaka has been delivering world-class cuisine in Nevada as one of Las Vegas’ oldest Japanese restaurants. Osaka embraces a heightened sense of respect for quality and authenticity – which has earned this locals favorite repeated recognition on the “Best of Las Vegas” restaurants, being honored 20 times. Osaka Japanese Bistro has even  garnered acclaim in Japan with the Asahi Shukan 50 best restaurants award.

Best Japanese Food Restaurants: Obsession and Art Form

Osaka sashimi platter of fresh sliced fish arranged in beautiful display

The best Japanese restaurants never happen by chance. The challenge requires careful consideration of many factors beyond an authentic menu and highly trained chefs. From the initial tea service by a warm and welcoming staff, the entire meal experience will resemble a grand ceremony of Japanese cuisine and culture. The best restaurants must successfully incorporate a combination of quality elements in order to achieve worthy applause.

The Best Japanese Food Ingredients

Fresh seafood is crucial with the numerous dishes that include eel, squid, shellfish and a wide range of fish species not commonly served in other cultures. A keen and deliberate knowledge of every aspect of ‘marine catch’ is brought to bear on fish market selections, such as knowing the collagen content of each species which determines whether the prepared fish is sliced thin (sashimi) or served thick-cut (tuna).

Seasonal produce is really an approval of taste, crispness, and bright appearance. Some may feel as if vegetables take a back seat in Japanese cooking, but actually, they are skillfully combined with dishes to accentuate taste or heighten texture. There is no lack of respect for hearty Japanese vegetable dishes which often include Napa cabbage, carrots, onions, leeks, tofu, onions, and shiitake mushrooms.

Perfect Rice a Foundation for the Best Japanese Food

Osaka steamed rice

A discussion of authentic Japanese cuisine would not be complete without mentioning the skillful perfection that goes into preparing the menu’s most basic staple – that is, the rice. Sticky, short-grained, and of as many varieties and uses; as a base for capturing the liquid nuances of flavorful dishes, in the rolling of sushi, in the making of rice cakes (mochi) and in the fermentation of rice wine (saki), a good Japanese restaurant will always serve its rice cooked to perfection.

Unique to Japanese dishes are its seasonings such as miso (soybean paste), mirin (sweet rice wine), goma (sesame oil), wasabi (Japanese horseradish), and shoyu (soy sauce) – and its spices, which include uniquely Japanese combinations of red chiles, orange peel, ginger, Japanese pepper, and sesame seeds. Soup stocks made from kombu kelp, dried shiitake mushrooms, bonito flakes, or bones and vegetables create the depth of flavor in Japanese cuisine. These are all essential pantry items in any good Japanese kitchen.

Best Restaurants Have Skilled and Masterful Chefs

Japanese teppan yaki master chef at the grill with meat and veggies

And finally, the best japanese restaurants will embrace the most skilled chefs trained in the art of sushi, teppanyaki , tempura, stir-fry, and a host of other stylized cooking innovations using cookery, tools, and knives unique to Japan. The food, techniques, and the tools used in Japanese cuisine are common to no other Asian culinary region. The overall dining experience as enjoyed in a premier Japanese restaurant is immersive, satisfying, and a memorable experience.

Restaurant Open Late

Long a hangout and night spot for Las Vegans, from Strip entertainers to casino staff stopping by for a late night meal, Osaka Japanese Restaurant has always had a special flare for providing great fare for late night diners. Sushi and other Osaka specialties are perfect for a light, late night meal. Osaka Henderson features jazz nights with live music by local entertainers, adding atmosphere and fun to dining out.  Visit one of our two locations in Las Vegas (open until 2:00 AM) and Henderson (open until 12:00 AM Mon-Thu and Sun, open until 2:00 AM Fri and Sat)